Flexible Working hours brings gains

Management Issues recently published an article titled “Flexible working boosts the bottom line” that reports on some very interesting research results that says:

…a new study has found that greater flexibility reduces absenteeism, improves employee health and even helps to improve employee commitment.

The research report, released by Wake Forest University, provides some very interesting results. Look for my analysis toward the end of this post.

The study, as explained in the MI article is:

…a health survey completed by 3,193 employees of a large multinational pharmaceutical company, shows that flexible working is associated with definitive improvements in absenteeism rates, job commitment and employee health.

Some interesting results from the research:

  • An increase in flexibility of working hours was associated with a decrease in absence and and an increase in job performance
  • Part-time and flextime options create a culture of flexibility, especially when managers and supervisors encourage a proper ‘work-life‘ balance.

The research is summed up thusly:

“This study provides evidence that flexibility is associated with health or well-being over time,” said Joseph G. Grzywacz, Ph.D., senior author and an associate professor of family medicine.

“For managers, the results suggest that implementing flexible work arrangements can contribute to the bottom-line.”

Analysis:

I’m a big believer in flexible work arrangements…everyone that I know who works from home or has some other type of flex time arrangement is much more happy with their job. They feel as though their employer understands that there is things in life other than work…and…many of these people work much more than the ‘required’ 40 hours a week because they feel much more excited and interested in their job.

Contrast that with the folks that slog through a job that still holds to the 8 to 5 mentality and, for the most part, you’ll see less happy folks.

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Rachel Clarkson
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I totally agree, a happy employee can work 10 (if not more) times better than an exhausted one. Motivation is a key component and having a balance between work and life is essential. Thanks for the post