Links for October 7 2012

  • Managing Expectations is an Art — Gene De Libero – Digital Marketing Strategist and Technologist

    Quote: I learned early in my career that setting and managing expectations [especially my own] was a skill I’d have to master if I wanted to succeed. It never mattered who the audience was – parents, the boss, a business partner, my wife, the kids, vendors, teachers, the guy whose car I rear-ended…you fill in the blank. Without properly managing expectations right from jump in just about every scenario I realized that things can, and often do, go south in a New York minute.

  • Constraints Drive Innovation | Jim Highsmith.com

    Quote: The bottom line is that constraints provide the delivery team with critical information that helps them be innovative and effective. As such, constraints should be carefully considered because they can guide the team to an effective solution, or done wrong, to one that is awful. Don’t forget to think carefully about this third point on the Agile Triangle.

  • A Tale of Two Datas – OCDQ Blog – Obsessive-Compulsive Data Quality by Jim Harris

    Quote: In order to move our discussions forward regarding “big data” and its data management and business intelligence challenges, we have to stop fiercely defending our traditional perspectives about structure and quality in order to effectively manage both the form and essence of the two datas.  We also have to stop fiercely defending our traditional perspectives about data analytics, since there will be some data use cases where depth and detailed analysis may not be necessary to provide business insight.

  • Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking – Justin Fox – Harvard Business Review

    Quote: Data-driven predictions can succeed — and they can fail. It is when we deny our role in the process that the odds of failure rise. Before we demand more of our data, we need to demand more of ourselves.

  • Are You Treating People Like They’re Stupid? » Brass Tack Thinking

    Quote: We want to believe we’d never treat someone like they’re stupid, but in fact, we do it in subtle ways all the time. I know my self-reflection on the topic wasn’t exactly comfortable, and even writing this post reminded me that I need to be more conscious of it in my own behavior.