Links for April 17 2011

  • Because You Matter by Danny Brown on Social Media Marketing Blog

    Quote: We spend so much time wondering how we can be like someone else. How we can have that person’s success. But you know what? There is absolutely nothing wrong with who you are. Right here. Right now.

  • What High-Performing Companies Track by Skip Reardon on Six Disciplines

    Quote: A study on HR metrics by i4cp shows that higher-performing companies are more apt to measure talent-related metrics than lower performers. Common talent-related metrics include movement within the organization, quality of hires, quality of promotions and the cost of training/development.

  • Make Your Content Make a Difference By Colleen Jones on Smashing Magazine

    Quote: Content strategy is planning for every aspect of content to get results. That goes far beyond writing the copy. When getting strategic about content, focus on three key areas: analysis, editorial and architecture. While explaining content strategy in detail literally requires a book (or two or three), I’d like to share with you a concise introduction to each area in this article.

  • Greasing The Skids of Communication by Elmer Boutin on The Crossing of Marketing and IT

    Quote: There is a lesson to be learned. I propose those IT and Marketing departments who find themselves in disagreement consider having an in-house technology summit. At this meeting, sit down and discuss the challenges each side faces in an open and honest way. At the end, with guidance and direction in hand, appoint a person from each side to be the liaison who will be empowered to communicate and help make decisions on behalf of their department. Let those two work out the priorities and permissions and bring the results to their respective departments.

  • The 4 Ways IT is Driving Innovation an interview with Erik Brynjolfsson on The Magazine – MIT Sloan Management Review

    Quote: Information technology is also a catalyst for complementary changes: It’s what economists call a “general purpose technology” that sets off waves of complementary innovations in things like business processes, new ways of reaching customers, new ways of connecting to suppliers, internal organization to the company. These complementary changes are often 10 times as large as the size of the initial investments in the IT itself and have profound and long-lasting effects on our ability to create goods and services.

  • This Old Thing?: Why new technology needs to keep old technology in mind by Hana Schank on UX Magazine

    Quote: As we develop new technologies, we need to think about all of the unintentional yet important information old technology communicates. As an information architect, I find myself making the counter argument so frequently—that we need to think about new processes and new models—that it’s easy to overlook the importance of the old model

  • Putting Personal Choice into Enterprise IT? by Michael Fauscette:

    Quote: Both the bottom up employee grassroots efforts and the new top down CIO policy shift signal a change for IT in a much broader sense. Web 2.0 taught us that software and tech tools can be simple, elegant and mask complexity while increasing productivity and functionality. The IT shop of the future is one that continues to effectively manage risk and security but also empowers employees by enabling personal choice that will increase productivity and satisfaction.